Quick Web App Prototyping with Spring Boot & MongoDB


Quick Web App Prototyping with Spring Boot & MongoDB
// Java Advent

Back in one of my previous projects I was asked to produce a little contingency application. The schedule was tight and the scope simple. The in-house coding standard is PHP, so trying to get a classic Java EE stack in place would have been a real challenge. And, to be really honest, completely oversized. So, what then? I took the chance and gave Spring a try. I used it before, but in old versions, hidden away in the tech stack of the portal software I was plagued with at this time.

My goal was to have something the WebOps can simply put on a server with Java installed and run it. No fiddling with dozens of XML configurations and memory fine tuning. Just as easy as java -jar application.jar.
It was the perfect call for “Spring Boot”. This Spring project is all about making it easy to bring you, the developer, up to speed and take away the need of loads of configuration and boilerplate coding.

Another thing my project was crying for was a document-oriented data storage. I mean, the main purpose of the application was to offer a digital version of a real-world paper form. So why create a relational mess if we can represent the document as a document?! I used MongoDB in a couple of small projects before, so I decided to go with it.

What has this got to do with this article? Well, I will show you how quickly you can bring together all the bits and pieces needed for a web application. Spring Boot will make a lot of things fairly easy and will keep the code minimal. And at the end you will have a JAR file, which is executable and can be deployed by just dropping it onto a server. Your WebOps will love you for it.

Let’s imagine we are about to create the next big product administration web application. As it is the next big thing, it needs a big name: Productr (this is the reason I am a software engineer and not in sales or marketing…).
Productr will do amazing things and this article will show you its early stages, which are:

  • providing a simple REST interface to query all available products
  • loading these products from a MongoDB
  • providing a production-ready monitoring facility
  • displaying all products by using a JavaScript UI

All you need to start is:

  • Java 8
  • Maven
  • Your favourite IDE (IntelliJ, Eclipse, vi, edlin, a butterfly…)
  • A browser (ok, or Internet Explorer / MS Edge, but who would really want this?!)

And for the impatient, the code is also available on GitHub.

Let’s get started

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