Tag Archives: GWT

GWT EventBus Example


via GWT EventBus Example | Examples Java Code Geeks.

In this example we will learn about GWT EventBus. The Google Web Toolkit is a development framework for creating Ajax-enabled web applications in Java. Tools and technologies used in this example are Java 1.8, Eclipse Luna 4.4.2, Eclipse GWT Plugin 2.6

GWT JSNI Example


via GWT JSNI Example | Examples Java Code Geeks.

In this example we will learn about GWT JSNI. The Google Web Toolkit is a development framework for creating Ajax-enabled web applications in Java. Tools and technologies used in this example are Java 1.8, Eclipse Luna 4.4.2, Eclipse GWT Plugin 2.6

GMAIL API INTEGRATION IN RUBY


via Gmail API Integration with Ruby.

Recently, while automating a functional test-case, I met with a requirement where, for every transaction, I had to verify the content of an email sent to users. Coming from a UI automation background, I initially thought of automating the Gmail Web UI using Selenium WebDriver.

However, after more searching, I found that Gmail’s UI is developed in Google Web ToolKit (GWT), which is highly dynamic and generates random IDs to all of the DOM elements in every session. After discovering this, I decided to give up this approach, because it would be very difficult to handle these dynamic IDs in our WebDriver code. I then began looking into alternative approaches.

After more research, I found out that in 2014 Google released their official Gmail APIs, which provide a RESTful interface to both read Gmail mailboxes and send emails. I decided to use this approach because it was much more robust and it allows users to have more control over their Gmail inbox.

This implementation required me to use Ruby, which has specific client bindings for these APIs. To get started with the Ruby bindings, we need to install the official gem developed by the Google team for this command.

Hello World in Vaadin & DukeScript


via Hello World in Vaadin & DukeScript | Java Code Geeks.

On the face of it, Vaadin—and GWT in general—has a lot in common with DukeScript. Both are focused on providing browser-oriented solutions for Java developers and have good integration with IDEs, thanks to their native support for Maven. However, these aspects are really all that they have in common. From the programming model, to how the frameworks process the code, to how applications are deployed, Vaadin and DukeScript are totally different.

To really drive these points home, let’s start by looking at the programming models of Vaadin and DukeScript. Though the way in which you program in Java is markedly different, each has a really good motivation that makes perfect sense for the applicable target developer audience. In that sense, there is no “better” or “worse” in this story, there’s simply two different ways of enabling Java developers to have access to browser-based platforms on all kinds of devices.

In Vaadin, a major demographic in terms of developer audience is Java Swing developers who want to move their Java desktop business applications to the web and to mobile devices. For this reason, Vaadin provides a component model comparable to that of Swing. A range of GUI components, such as “Label” and “Button” are provided, as well as heaps of more complex components, including a variety of graphs and other impressive UI-related features, together with “Layouts” and “Events”, which again is reminiscent of Swing.

GWT Widgets Tutorial


via GWT Widgets Tutorial | Examples Java Code Geeks.

In this example we will learn about GWT Widgets. User interfaces in GWT applications are constructed using widgets that are contained within panels.Widgets allow you to interact with the user. Panels control the placement of user interface elements on the page. Tools and technologies used in this example are Java 1.8, Eclipse Luna 4.4.2, Eclipse GWT Plugin 2.6

Table Of Contents

1. Introduction
2. GWT Widgets
2.1 Button
2.2 Radio button
2.3 CheckBox
2.4 DatePicker
2.5 ToggleButton
2.6 TextBox, PasswordTextBox
2.7 TextArea, RichTextArea
2.8 HyperLink
2.9 ListBox, MenuBar
2.10 Tree, CellTree
2.11 SuggestBox
2.12 FlexTable, Grid and CellTable
2.13 CellBrowser, TabBar, DialogBox
3. Creating custom widgets
3.1 Building Composites
3.2 New widget using Java
3.3 Create a widget that wraps JavaScript using JSNI methods
4. JavaScript Native Interface
4.1 Build widgets using JSNI
5. External libraries for creating GWT widgets
5.1 GWT Portlets
5.1.1 Dialog and CssButton
5.1.2 FormBuilder
5.1.3 ToolButton and ShadowPanel
5.2 GWT Mosaic
5.3 Sencha GXT
6. Download the source file

Secure REST services using Spring Security


Overview : Recently, I was working on a project which uses a REST services layer to communicate with the client application (GWT application). So I have spent a lot of to time to figure out how to secure the REST services with Spring Security. This article describe the solution I found, and I have implemented. […]

https://crazygui.wordpress.com/2014/08/29/secure-rest-services-using-spring-security/

Packaging a GWT library jar


For creating a reusable jar from a gwt project, that can be used in other gwt projects, can be done using the following steps. I have used the gwt-maven-plugin for this process. Before getting started we need to mavenize the project. For that we need to create the directory structure like src/main/java (the place where […]

https://nailthecode.wordpress.com/2014/10/11/packaging-a-gwt-library-jar/