Tag Archives: Luna

GWT EventBus Example


via GWT EventBus Example | Examples Java Code Geeks.

In this example we will learn about GWT EventBus. The Google Web Toolkit is a development framework for creating Ajax-enabled web applications in Java. Tools and technologies used in this example are Java 1.8, Eclipse Luna 4.4.2, Eclipse GWT Plugin 2.6

GWT JSNI Example


via GWT JSNI Example | Examples Java Code Geeks.

In this example we will learn about GWT JSNI. The Google Web Toolkit is a development framework for creating Ajax-enabled web applications in Java. Tools and technologies used in this example are Java 1.8, Eclipse Luna 4.4.2, Eclipse GWT Plugin 2.6

GWT Widgets Tutorial


via GWT Widgets Tutorial | Examples Java Code Geeks.

In this example we will learn about GWT Widgets. User interfaces in GWT applications are constructed using widgets that are contained within panels.Widgets allow you to interact with the user. Panels control the placement of user interface elements on the page. Tools and technologies used in this example are Java 1.8, Eclipse Luna 4.4.2, Eclipse GWT Plugin 2.6

Table Of Contents

1. Introduction
2. GWT Widgets
2.1 Button
2.2 Radio button
2.3 CheckBox
2.4 DatePicker
2.5 ToggleButton
2.6 TextBox, PasswordTextBox
2.7 TextArea, RichTextArea
2.8 HyperLink
2.9 ListBox, MenuBar
2.10 Tree, CellTree
2.11 SuggestBox
2.12 FlexTable, Grid and CellTable
2.13 CellBrowser, TabBar, DialogBox
3. Creating custom widgets
3.1 Building Composites
3.2 New widget using Java
3.3 Create a widget that wraps JavaScript using JSNI methods
4. JavaScript Native Interface
4.1 Build widgets using JSNI
5. External libraries for creating GWT widgets
5.1 GWT Portlets
5.1.1 Dialog and CssButton
5.1.2 FormBuilder
5.1.3 ToolButton and ShadowPanel
5.2 GWT Mosaic
5.3 Sencha GXT
6. Download the source file

Drools Workflow Example


via Drools Workflow Example | Examples Java Code Geeks.

Workflow says exactly what will happen at each stage in the process. As soon as the workflow reaches a step, we will fire the actions associated with it. Ruleflow does something similar but we don’t have any control on the actual rules that may fire as they are selected by the rule engine.

A business process or workflow describes the order in which a series of steps need to be executed, using a flow chart. This makes it much easier to describe a complex composition of various tasks.

Drools 5.0 introduces a powerful (extensible) workflow engine. It allows users to specify their business logic using both rules and processes (where powerful interaction between processes and rules is possible) and offers a unified enviroment.

If you want to more know about Drools Introduction or its setup, read here.

This example uses the following frameworks:

  1. Maven 3.2.3
  2. Java 8
  3. Drools 6.2
  4. Eclipse  as the IDE, version Luna 4.4.1.

Drools Salience Example


via Drools Salience Example | Examples Java Code Geeks.

In this article we will look into an example of Drools Salience Example.

So what is salience and why do we need it?

Salience means to be most noticeable and important. We will usesalience keyword against a rule to set the priority. Before we start with the example, let’s work on our setup.

If you want to more know about Drools Introduction or its setup, readhere.

This example uses the following frameworks:

  1. Maven 3.2.3
  2. Java 8
  3. Drools 6.2
  4. Eclipse  as the IDE, version Luna 4.4.1.

Java 8 Default Methods Tutorial


via Java 8 Default Methods Tutorial | Examples Java Code Geeks.

In this article we are going to explain how to use and take advantage of the possibility to implement default methods in interfaces. This is one of the most important features that are available since Java update 8.

All examples have been implemented using Eclipse Luna version 4.4 and Java version 8 update 5.

Apache Camel Exchange Example


via Apache Camel Exchange Example | Examples Java Code Geeks.

Camel Exchange represents an abstraction for an exchange of messages which involves a request message and its corresponding reply or an exception message. It consists of the below components:

  1. Exchange ID – A unique ID that identifies the exchange.
  2. MEP – A pattern that denotes whether you’re using the InOnly or InOut messaging.
  3. InOnly message – Contains only a one-way message (also known as an Event message). For example, the JMS messaging.
  4. InOut message – It represents a request-response message. In this scenario, you not only have a request message, you also have an out message containing the reply of the request sent. For example, HTTP-based transports.
  5. Exception – If an error occurs at any time during routing, an Exception will be set in the exception field
  6. Properties – Similar to message headers, but they last for the duration of the entire exchange.

We will see an example of each component, lets now come to the setup part.
This example uses the following frameworks:

  1. Maven 3.2.3
  2. Apache Camel 2.15.1
  3. Spring 4.1.5.RELEASE
  4. Eclipse  as the IDE, version Luna 4.4.1.