Tag Archives: Netty

Building a Microservices-based REST API with RestExpress, Java EE, and MongoDB: Part 1


Develop a well-architected and well-documented REST API, built on a tightly-integrated collection of Java EE-based microservices.

https://programmaticponderings.wordpress.com/2015/05/18/building-a-microservices-based-rest-api-with-restexpress-java-and-mongodb-part-1/

Building a Microservices-based REST API with RestExpress, Java EE, and MongoDB: Part 2


Develop a well-architected and well-documented REST API, built on a tightly integrated collection of Java EE-based microservices. Note: All code available on GitHub. For the version of code that matches the details in this blog post, checkout the master branch, v1.0.0 tag (after running git clone …, run a ‘git checkout tags/v1.0.0’ command). Previous Post In […]

https://programmaticponderings.wordpress.com/2015/05/31/building-a-microservices-based-rest-api-with-restexpress-java-ee-and-mongodb-part-2/

Building a Microservices-based REST API with RestExpress, Java EE, and MongoDB: Part 3


Develop a well-architected and well-documented REST API, built on a tightly integrated collection of Java EE-based microservices.

https://programmaticponderings.wordpress.com/2015/06/05/building-a-microservices-based-rest-api-with-restexpress-java-ee-and-mongodb-part-3/

Netty: A Different Kind of Web(Socket) Server


via Netty: A Different Kind of Web(Socket) Server | Keyhole Software.

Netty is used today in all kinds of applications, all over the Internet, to handle thousands (if not millions) of chat conversations, multiplayer games including Minecraft, Twitter, and many other applications. However, it hasn’t made it very far into the mindshare of enterprise programmers developing business applications.

I believe that Netty can introduce a new wave of functionality that other solutions simply cannot match because of its fully bi-directional text and binary non-HTTP data transport, along with its support for many more concurrent clients than traditional “thread-per-socket” servers.

You may know about Netty’s prowess with WebSockets, but did you know it can function extremely well as a traditional web server? Due to its very thoughtful design, by adding appropriate handlers to its pipeline, Netty can handle virtually any traffic. It can also handle multiple types concurrently, such as WebSockets and HTTP over the same port at the same time. By combining these together, programmers are spared from dealing with nuisances such as CORS (Cross Origin Resource Sharing) that can rear their ugly head when a browser tries to make requests to servers it did not download from.