Tag Archives: VorlonJS

How to Create a VorlonJS Plugin to Test Your Own JavaScript Remotely


via How to Create a Vorlon.js Plugin to Test Your Own JavaScript Remotely – Tuts+ Code Tutorial.

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During the keynote at the recent //BUILD 2015 conference, our team at Microsoft released Vorlon.js, a tool to debug your website.

Vorlon.js is mainly composed of a dashboard which displays data coming from your site. To make it work, you only have to reference a script in your site code.

Remotely Debug and Test JavaScript with New VorlonJS Plug-ins


via What’s New in Vorlon.js?.

In April 2015, our team of engineers and tech evangelists at Microsoft launched Vorlon.js, an open source, extensible, platform-agnostic tool for remotely debugging and testing your JavaScript.

When we launched the project during the Microsoft Build Developer Conference keynote, we had only three plugins: the DOM Explorer, the Interactive Console and Modernizr. We knew at this time that the key to the success for a project such as Vorlon is the quantity and quality of plugins. When you want to debug your website, you do not want to do much complicated things. You just want to pick the correct plugin and get the correct information.

This is why we made this project open source. We know you have a lot of ideas to provide great debug experiences to web developers.

So two months, 66 pull requests, 78 issues and 547 commits later: we are proud to announce that we (YOU and the team) just released Vorlon.js version 0.0.15! You can get it by either cloning our GitHub repository or installing it using npm command tool (npm install –g vorlon).

Note: if you are still wondering what Vorlon.js is, please read this article from David Catuhe first:_http://blogs.msdn.com/b/eternalcoding/archive/2015/04/30/why-we-made-vorlon-js-and-how-to-use-it-to-debug-your-javascript-remotely.aspx).

Let’s have a look at what is new in this version.

How to create a vorlonJS plug-in to test your own JavaScript remotely


via How to create a vorlon.js plug-in to test your own JavaScript remotely – CodeProject.

Vorlon.js is mainly composed of a dashboard which displays data coming from your site. To make it work, you only have to reference a script in your site code.

During the keynote at the recent //BUILD 2015 conference, our team at Microsoft released Vorlon.js, a tool to debug your website.

Vorlon.js is mainly composed of a dashboard which displays data coming from your site. To make it work, you only have to reference a script in your site code.

Introducing VorlonJS: How to Use It to Debug Your Javascript Remotely


via Introducing Vorlon.js: How to Use It to Debug Your Javascript Remotely.

This article is part of a web dev tech series from Microsoft. Thank you for supporting the partners who make SitePoint possible.

Recently at //BUILD/ 2015 we announced vorlon.js – an open source, extensible, platform-agnostic tool for remotely debugging and testing your JavaScript. I had the opportunity to create vorlon.js with the help of some talented engineers and tech evangelists at Microsoft (the same guys that brought you http://www.babylonjs.com/).

Vorlon.js is powered by Node.js, Socket.IO, and late-night coffee. I would like to share with you why we made it, how to incorporate it into your own testing workflow, and also share some more details into the art of building a JavaScript library like it.

Why We Made VorlonJS and How to Use it to Debug your JavaScript Remotely


via Why We Made vorlon.js and How to Use it to Debug your JavaScript Remotely | Javalobby.

Recently at //BUILD/ 2015 we announced vorlon.js – an open source, extensible, platform-agnostic tool for remotely debugging and testing your JavaScript. I had the opportunity to create vorlon.JS with the help of some talented engineers and tech evangelists at Microsoft. (The same guys that brought you http://www.babylonjs.com)

Vorlon.js is powered by node.JS, socket.io, and late-night coffee. I would like to share with you why we made it, how to incorporate it into your own testing workflow, and also share some more details into the art of building a JS library like it.