Tag Archives: Web Audio

Video: Ukulele Hero


One of the things that make video games awesome is that you can use anything to make a game. One of the things that make being a web developer awesome is that you have a lot of amazing APIs at your disposal.

Why not combine both for maximum effect? Like using the Web Audio API to make your own music driven game using a real life ukulele as controller? I’d like to show you how, why and on top you’ll learn some music theory.

Creating an Accessible Breakout Game Using Web Audio and SVG


via Creating an Accessible Breakout Game Using Web Audio and SVG.

This article is part of a web development series from Microsoft. Thank you for supporting the partners who make SitePoint possible.

As the co-author of Babylon.js, a WebGL gaming engine, I was always felt a little uneasy listening to folks discuss accessibility best practices at web conferences. The content created with Babylon.js is indeed completely inaccessible to blind people. Making the web accessible to everyone is very important. I’m more convinced than ever about that as I’m personally touched via my own son. And so I wanted to contribute to the accessibility of the web in some way.

What Do You Mean by “Shaders”? How to Create Them with HTML5 and WebGL


via What Do You Mean by “Shaders”? How to Create Them with HTML5 and WebGL.

This article is part of a web dev tech series from Microsoft. Thank you for supporting the partners who make SitePoint possible.

You may have noticed that we first talked a lot about babylon.js last year and most recently we’ve released babylon.js v2.0 with 3D sound positioning (with WebAudio) and volumetric light scattering.

If you missed the v1.0 announcement, first you can catch-up with the keynote for day two here and go directly to 2:24-2:28. In it, Microsoft evangelists Steven Guggenheimer and John Shewchuk demoed how the Oculus Rift support was added to Babylon.js. And one of the key things for this demo was the work we did on a specific shader to simulate lenses as you can see in this picture:

Video: Signal Processing with the Web Audio API


With the advent of the Web Audio API, processing audio signals is now possible in realtime within browsers. Let’s take a look into what raw audio data actually is, the signal processing theory behind it, and practical implementations of analyzing audio using the Web Audio API. We’ll see how effects processing, audio analysis tools, and DSP algorithms can be constructed, used, and shared all in JavaScript.